Equipment/Router

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Class Red equipment: Do not use without specific training.
(More about equipment classes)

Equipment / Router and router table

Summary

A router is a tool used to rout out (hollow out) an area in the face of a wood workpiece. The router may be mounted upside down in a router table or bench. The router's base plate is mounted to the underside of the table, with a hole allowing the bit to protrude above the table top. This allows the work to be passed over the router, rather than passing the router over the work. This has benefits when working with smaller objects and makes some router operations safer to execute.

Key Points

  • No operation that involves allowing the operator’s body near the cutter may be performed while the power cable is plugged in the mains electrical socket.
  • The collet in the router must be appropriate for the cutter bit in the router and that the collet housing must be cleaned after each use.
  • Spanners must not be left on the driveshaft when the power is engaged.

Health and Safety

Full details of the risks associated with this device may be found in the File:RouterRA.pdf. Here the key hazards identified will be listed.

  • Loosening router blade (tighten fully and make sure have clean and correct collet/cutter)
  • Dust build-up in collet (clean after every use)
  • Electrocution (router PAT tested yearly)
  • Handling cutter
  • Cutter coming loose during operation (must tighten blade/clean collet before & after use and use correct collett/blade)
  • Router being dropped (must hold router firmly during operation)
  • Loose hair/clothes getting caught (users must tie up dangling hair/jewellery/clothes)
  • Ear damage (ear protection is necessary)
  • Eye damage (eye protection is necessary)
  • Injury to fingers due to operating router (do not adjust router settings when plugged in)
  • Exposure to dust (must use extraction where appropriate)
  • Use of incorrect collets (must check whether ¼ " or 6 mm cutter blade/collett)
  • Workpiece being fired across room (must be clamped in freehand and guards must be used for table operation)
  • Router trigger left enabled (only applies to router table)
  • Router coming out of clamps (only applies to router table)

Insert non-formatted text here== Using the Router ==

Before using the router pelase watch the following video: How to use a router safely (Video)

  • Free Hand Procedure

The operator loosens the collet which hold the router bits by holding the drive shaft secure and loosening the collet nut using the spanner provided with the router. In order to loosen the cutter the drive shaft and bolt are turned away from each-other. They are turned towards each-other to tighten the chuck. The operator places the router bit in the collet chuck and tightens it so that it may not come free during cutting.

The operator also attaches the cutting guard and the parallel on the router for free-hand cuts. The piece of work to be routed must be securely clamped or it should be ensured that it will not move during the cut. The router is turned on (the blade starts spinning) and the router is passed slowly and evenly from right to left against the surface to make the cut. In the case of climb cutting (not normally recommended as this may result in a poor cut finish) this direction is reversed. When the length of the piece has been cut the router is moved away and turned off. The setup procedure is reversed: parallel removed, chuck loosened, blade removed and chuck tightened. Any chippings, dust and other mess is cleaned up and disposed of.

  • Table Router Procedure

The router is mounted into the router table and made secure with the use of the clamps on the underside. This is done before the blade is mounted and with the routed power disconnected to avoid unnecessary risk of injury.

The router table must be clamped to the surface it is placed on to avoid movement of the table during use.

A vacuum cleaner or other means of dust extraction is secured to the dust extraction port in the router table. This is important as it allows the work to be unimpeded by detritus but also maintains a dust-free environment as much as possible.

The operator loosens the chuck which hold the router cutter blade by loosening the bolt on the drive shaft and holding the drive shaft secure with the spanner provided with the router. In order to loosen the cutter the drive shaft and bolt are turned away from each-other. They are turned towards each other to tighten the chuck. The operator places a router bit in the chuck and tightens it adequately so that it may not come free during cutting.

The plug from the router is plugged into the router table which is plugged into the mains in turn. This allows the router table's override switch to be used instead of the router's power switch. The operator must make sure the override switch is kept off.

In order for the router to be used in the table the power trigger must be taped down. This is another reason why the override switch is necessary.

The guards on the router table must be aligned appropriately for the work piece so that they maintain pressure on the workpiece into the cutter blade.

The router is turned on (the blade starts spinning) with the override switch and the work piece is passed slowly and evenly from right to left against the surface to make a cut. Here push sticks must be used to keep fingers away from the router blade. When the length of the piece has been cut the router is turned off.

The setup procedure is reversed: power cords detached and any tape used to hold the trigger down must be removed, chuck loosened, blade removed and chuck tightened, and then the table clamps removed followed by the router removed from the table. Any chippings, dust and other mess is cleaned up and disposed of.

Owners

The Owners are those who have volunteered to be in charge of the equipment, organising maintenance, training others to use it, and generally being a point of contact. The current Owners of the Router are:

  • Louis Kovalevsky
  • Ned Booker

Trainers

  • Robin Sterling
  • Martin Lenz

Trained users

  • Robyn Kerrison 02/12/15 (Robin Sterling)
  • Ed Robertson 02/12/15 (Robin Sterling)
  • Mark Radford 14/01/16 (Robin Sterling)
  • Martin Lenz 14/01/16 (Robin Sterling)
  • Martin de Selincourt 27/1/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Tobias Wenzel 27/1/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • David Haines 27/1/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Andrea Cipri 09/02/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Stephen Harrison 09/02/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Francois Eve 11/03/16 (Robin Sterling)
  • Jeremy Minton 11/03/16 (Robin Sterling)
  • Olivier M 11/03/16 (Robin Sterling)
  • Mark Wainwright 11/03/16 (Robin Sterling)
  • Craig Easton 16/3/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Paul Edgington 16/3/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Thomas Gillespie 16/3/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • John Sturdy 16/3/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Jennifer Herbert 16/3/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Shunsuke Fujibayash­i 16/3/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Giles Aston 22/3/16 (Robin Sterling)
  • Tom Parker 22/3/16 (Robin Sterling)
  • Michael Dales 07/06/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Frodi Jones 07/06/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • David Horsnell 07/06/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Cong Cong Bo 24/08/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Craig Richardson 24/08/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Henry Begg 24/08/16 (Martin Lenz)
  • Adrian Leger 12/10/16 (Martin Lenz)

Further Information

File:RouterRA.pdf How to use a router safely (Video)