Equipment/EggBot

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Equipment / EggBot Pro

Summary

The EggBot is available for use by any member of makespace (with or without training). It has an orange sticker.

Training sessions for using the EggBot will be advertised on the makespace website and on the forum.

Using the EggBot

Owners

The Owners are those nominally in charge of the equipment, organising its maintenance, helping others to use it, and generally being a point of contact.

The current Owners of the Eggbot are:

If you have any questions, problems or concerns around the EggBot, or would like a personal introduction to how it all works, these are the people to contact.

Training

The fact sheet for the EggBot can be found here: [1] (TBC)

Health and Safety

The EggBot is a relatively safe to operate, however if not operated correctly could malfunction and damage itself and surrounding equipment. The diamond engraver carries a risk of injury from the sharp point and also from flying debris.

Egg blowing carries a risk of food poisoning (Salmonella) care should be taken when blowing eggs and good hygiene practices should be maintained.

  • ONLY USE THE EGGBOT IF YOU HAVE READ THE SAFETY NOTES BELOW
  • NEVER LEAVE THE EGGBOT RUNNING UNATTENDED
  • ONLY ENGRAVE OR DRAW ON APPROPRIATE MATERIAL

The risk assessment is located here: Formal Risk Assessment: EggBot

Safety Notes

  • SHARP POINT - when handling the diamond engraver (eg. when fitting to the EggBot) take care not to cut yourself
  • TRAPPING - The machine has stepper motors and clamps. Take care clamping your material and do not touch the machine while it is operating
  • POISONING - Raw eggs carry a risk of Salmonella food poisoning. If you break an egg ensure you clean up and sanitise the area with a disinfectant. When blowing eggs maintain good hygiene practises and follow the egg blowing guide to minimise the risk.

Food Poisoning Risk

How can a Salmonella infection be avoided during the blowing out of eggs?

As children are especially at risk of developing salmonellosis, they should not have any contact if at all possible with raw eggs. In particular children should not blow out any eggs. One safe alternative to painting blown out raw eggs are hard boiled eggs or eggs made from materials like wood, polystyrene or plastic.

When blowing out eggs, the following hygiene measures should be complied with in order to avoid an infection with Salmonella:

  • Only ever blow out fresh, clean eggs. The eggs can be washed with lukewarm water and a few drops of washing up liquid.
  • The sharp tools used to prick the eggs (for instance nails or needles) should be clean and washed thoroughly after use.
  • Wherever possible, an implement should be used to blow out eggs so as to avoid any direct contact with the mouth. The utensils that are particularly suited for blowing out eggs are, for instance, thin straws, disposable syringes with a thick needle. Drug stores or handicraft stores now stock miniature bellows for blowing out eggs, too.
  • Before painting, the blown out eggs should be cleansed on the inside and outside with lukewarm water and a few drops of washing up liquid in order to remove any remaining raw egg.
  • Any splashes of egg yolk or white should be removed immediately with kitchen roll and the work surfaces washed thoroughly.
  • Once finished, wash hands thoroughly with warm water and soap.

Instructions

Problems

Official Documentation and Further Information

  • EggBot Manual: [2]